Archive for category Business Ethics

A short conversation about lies

1: An Introduction

Let’s talk about lying.

Lies are instruments of manipulation and control.

Liars weaponise our natural inclination to trust.

They intentionally distort our world view.

Liars want to manipulate and use us.

That’s the point. That’s why they lie.

 

2: Capability and effectiveness

Our understanding, our grip on reality, is what makes us effective and capable. With good data we can adapt to and influence our world.

Liars undermine that data. They attack our grip on reality.

Their purpose?

To disempower us.

 

3: An environment of lies

Lying has become a part of everyday life.

The most famous politician in the world is a famous liar. He uses language not as a means of communication but as a weapon.

Corporations lie.

Adverts lie.

We are surrounded by lies.

 

4: “Get used to it”

Apologists for lying like to say, “Everybody lies. Politicians always lie. Get used to it.”

But this itself is a lie, and it’s a lie which suits the liars.

They are using their lies to manipulate and control us – but, if “everybody lies”, then what’s wrong with that? It’s what everybody does.

“Everybody lies” lets them off the hook.

 

“Everybody lies” can also be a cop-out. It suggests we needn’t take the time to work out the truth.

But that’s precisely what we need to do – if we’re not to become pawns in other people’s games.

 

5: Knowledge = power

Lies disempower us. Accurate knowledge and good data empowers us.

We see that in science. In engineering. In medicine.

It’s also true in society.

If our world view is based on lies we are easily manipulated. Easily controlled.

 

6: A prediction

So, for the benefit of all of us, for the benefit of our society, the fewer lies the better.

In any case, not everybody lies.

If that were true our world would fall apart.

The more “Everybody lies” becomes true, the more our society will begin to fail.

 

7: The destructive power of lies

Every human transaction or agreement relies on a bedrock of trust. If I can’t trust you to do what you say then we’ll never get anything done.

Lies damage society. Lies disempower humanity. They are grit in the machine.

Liars are a cancer amongst us.

 

8: You choose

Some politicians lie a lot. Some lie about important stuff.

Some lie less, or even not at all.

Choose the politicians who are not habitual liars.

Deny the liars their day in the sun.

 

  

For a detailed discussion of honesty, lies and propaganda, see Ethical Intelligence by Luke Andreski:

www.amazon.co.uk/Ethical-Intelligence-Luke-Andreski/dp/179580579X

Twitter & Facebook: @EthicalRenewal

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A short conversation about populism

1: An Introduction

Let’s talk about populism.

Populists pretend complex problems have simple answers. They like things so simple they become stupid. They like binary choices.

Populists demand you ‘take sides’. But isn’t it better not to take sides? Or at least not sides predefined by someone you may not wish to trust?

 

2: Divide and Rule

Polarisation is an authoritarian tool. It allows the manipulative to divide and rule.

But do we want to be divided, or ruled by immoral people?

Surely we have better things to think about, such as:

–   Asserting our shared humanity

–   Reversing environmental breakdown

–   Creating a just and sustainable world?

 

3: Victimhood

Yet populists love division.

They like to polarise.

They like an enemy. If no enemy’s handy, they’ll make one.

They like to act the victim, no matter how rich or powerful or privileged they are.

But, by creating ‘an enemy’, victims are precisely what they tend to produce.

 

It’s one of the great ironies of modern politics: pretend victims, mostly powerful, privileged and wealthy, creating real victims: usually the powerless and the poor.

 

4: Base Instincts

Populism appeals to our worse instincts.

It appeals to emotions of hatred, resentment, rage, tribalism,  ‘us’ and ‘them’.

Some instincts are good – but not all of them. They were developed over millions of years for a hunter gatherer existence…. but we are no longer hunter gatherers. Now we live in cities and inhabit virtual worlds. We exist within a complex web of connection, communication, interaction, participation.

In this complex modern world we need our better instincts to be brought into play:

  • Caring
  • Cooperation
  • Empathy
  • Creativity
  • Compassion

Populism doesn’t care about caring. Compassion isn’t on its agenda.

 

5: Facts

Populism ignores facts. Predictably, therefore, populists dislike experts.

Experts know stuff. People who know stuff are a nuisance if you want to manipulate others rather than inform.

Populists, on the other hand, exaggerate, hype up, overblow, dissimulate and deceive.

For the rest of us this can be confusing. It distracts from the facts.

But for the populists it’s useful. It keeps them in the public eye. It all makes news.

 

6: Distraction

“Forget facts!” populists declare. “Just LOOK AT US.”

Into our eyes… Not around the eyes… Into our eyes.

Soon we are mesmerised by the show. We can’t see that they’ve got their hands on our voting cards or their spiteful little fingers scrabbling at the grey matter within our skulls.

While we’re distracted populists get on with achieving what they want to achieve.

 

7: Lies

Populists like to smear, slander, denigrate and accuse.

They love to lie. Why not? They’ll say anything to make themselves popular.

And the tribalism they encourage forgives lies. Being part of the tribe becomes more important than integrity. The tribalised forget their own morality. They forget the importance of being honest.

Of course, for the populists, the lie’s not the thing.

They don’t care about lying – in fact, they like it.

The lies not the thing… The objective’s the thing:

–   Grubby ambition

–   Ugly greed

–   Pretending to serve others while serving only themselves.

Why let the truth interfere with objectives like these?

 

8: And more lies

And yet…. would you be happy if your brother, sister, father or mother were a liar?

Would you be keen to be known to be a liar yourself?

Is lying the example we want to set our children, our colleagues or our friends?

And, if not, we have to ask ourselves, “Is it truly acceptable – if we think about it for just a moment – for a President or a Prime Minister to be a liar?”

  

9: Morality

I’m sure it’s becoming clear from this discussion that populism is immoral.

Populists are serially dishonest, serially unreliable, serially self-serving, serially in it for number one.

They deny equality, kindness, our shared humanity, our compassionate human nature.

They create dissension, division, hatred, bloodshed, even war.

How can that possibly be moral?

How can it be moral to manipulate others rather than seek to explain – and, with honesty and accuracy, seek to persuade?

 

10: Resisting Populism

How do we resist populism?

At present it seems all-powerful – in the ascendant. It’s everywhere.

Populist leaders seem able to get away with anything…

One thing we can try is morality.

Not an old-fashioned, out-of-date, archaic morality – but a morality designed to tackle the issues of the 21st Century.

And the advantages of morality?

It’s hard to attack, slander or smear.

How can you condemn someone for being moral?

Morality is about caring for others.

How can you attack someone for caring for others?

Morality is about our shared humanity. Populism is about divide and rule.

 

11: A simple message

And morality’s message is simple:

  • Morality 1st
  • Integrity 1st
  • Honesty 1st

And

  • Make Humanity Great Again.

How can populism compete with that?

 

www.ethicalintelligence.org  “The ethics of common sense”

Twitter & Facebook: @EthicalRenewal

 

For a detailed discussion of the parallel topic of propaganda, see Ethical Intelligence by Luke Andreski:

www.amazon.co.uk/Ethical-Intelligence-Luke-Andreski/dp/179580579X

 

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The Practice of Ethics – A Leadership Guide

Morality – A critical success factor for business and society?

Luke Andreski – Graham Williams

 

There can be little doubt that we have reached a point in our history which is marked by profound ethical issues.

We face the acceleration of AI, an environmental crisis, the potential for future conflict over resource, probable large-scale migrations and an ascendancy of populist authoritarianism in politics across the world.

In parallel with this, another disturbing change has occurred. Morality has become unfashionable. It is no longer cool – and now carries with it connotations of ‘moralising’, of self-satisfaction or superiority, of being ‘moralistic’ or ‘preachy’. It’s as if, in the world of realpolitik and commerce, ethics no longer matter. Effectiveness and profit have taken morality’s place. ‘What’s in it for me?’ has become our guiding principle.

Yet this is a guiding principle which places our world in jeopardy. ‘What’s in it for me?’ cannot provide a solution to the major challenges which our businesses, our economies and even our species now face.

In addition to compassion, truth is at the heart of any moral code. If we cannot see our world clearly, if we are unable to separate reality from fake news or ideology, then how can we navigate our way towards personal, business or wider societal success? The reverse is also true. As our society drifts away from honesty, so it increasingly attacks it: a vicious circle we see all around us. It is now common to say, particularly of our politicians, that ‘everybody lies’. This then becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. Lying is normalised. We see this amongst some of the most prominent politicians of today’s world. A willingness to lie is no longer considered a quality which debars them from office. And the more they lie, the more they hate the truth. To quote George Orwell, “The further society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those who speak it.” A wonderful example of this is seen in this interview with Michael Gove, the British politician campaigning for Brexit and the re-election of the Boris Johnson government:

https://www.channel4.com/news/michael-gove-interview-on-truth-lies-and-brexit.

It is also replicated in the many attacks we see from populist politicians on journalism and the press. Populism disdains experts and facts.

 

“To assert that everybody lies becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. Lying is normalised.”

 

In collaboration with Graham Williams, a writer and consultant based in Cape Town, South Africa, I’ve been looking at how we can reassert the value of morality, honesty and compassion in a business context, and also for society as a whole. In a series of articles for Phase3 Consulting and HRZone I’ve argued for the value of ethics specifically within business. In my book Intelligent Ethics I expand this argument to society as a whole; and in his powerful work, The Virtuosa Organisation, Graham takes a similar approach.

 

There are so often situations in the marketplace where “business considerations” take precedence over ethical considerations – an either/or solution. Our contention is that this is a mistaken dichotomy. Business considerations (efficiency and profit) are in fact enhanced by adopting an ethical approach. Unethical practices exist in many toxic workplaces, including all forms of discrimination and exclusion, harassment, overt or unconscious prejudice and bullying – and tackling these can only benefit the performance, reputation and, ultimately, the profit of the business.

Leadership, training and coaching responses all too often fall into the ‘compliance’ and ‘rules’ category, when what is needed is:

  • Development of an intrinsic ethical maturity and value base
  • Encouragement of a learning, growth and mastery journey
  • Nurturing of appropriate application in the context of the situations faced and their community impacts

To assist with this, we have drawn together a map of ethical best practice, outlining a set of cultural, process and human capital considerations for business leaders, a framework for:

  • Providing a quick overview of the ethics landscape
  • Moving from a rules-based to a values-based mind-set
  • Guiding people how to behave positively and effectively, overcoming a bystander mentality
  • Entrenching an understanding that ethics is an important bridge in aligning behaviours with core values

 

“Business considerations (efficiency and profit) are in fact enhanced by adopting an ethical approach.”

 

We hope you find this guide useful.

 

The Practice of Ethics - A Leadership Guide - Luke Anddreski - Graham Williams Vs 1.1

 

Luke Andreski

Graham Williams

November 2019

 

 

 

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