Posts Tagged Business Ethics

A short conversation about honesty

1: An Introduction

Let’s talk about honesty.

Why is a good person honest?

Because a part of what goodness means, is to care about others.

If you care about other people, you’re honest with them.

Honesty shows respect.

 

2: Introducing someone who doesn’t like you

The degree to which someone lies to you is proportional to their disdain.

If they truly felt you were important they’d tell you the truth.

If you matter to them, they’ll know the truth matters to you.

But you don’t matter to a liar.

That’s why they’re happy to go on lying.

 

Narcissism, self-interest and indifference is the world liars occupy.

It’s the very air that they breathe.

 

3: The moral context

Honesty is a moral imperative.

Morality tells us to nurture those around us, to care for them.

You cannot nurture someone by lying to them.

In fact, the very opposite is true. Lies undermine and disempower. Lies weaken those who are lied to. That’s why the powerful lie. It reinforces their power.

 

Even ‘lying to protect’ patronises. It implies you know better than the person you’re lying to. It implies your superiority; their inferiority.

 

4: Equality

Yet morality tells us that in ourselves, as individuals, we are all equal.

Our actions, not our attributes, determine our moral worth.

We are equal whatever our ethnicity, origins, class or education.

Being honest with others recognises that equality.

It says, “You are as deserving of the truth as me.”

 

5: Facts = Power

Honesty empowers.

It places the full facts at your disposal and allows you to base your decisions and actions on these facts.

Facts make us strong.

Look at our technology, our incredible industrial society – all powered by fact.

Look at our engineering, our medicine, our science.

Look at the machines we build.

 

None of this would have been possible without facts, without honesty, without truth.

Engines don’t run on lies.

 

6: A flourishing human being

To be genuine with people, to be honest with them, is a signpost of morality.

Who would consider a liar a flourishing human being? Who would think them moral?

Who would want their closest friends to be liars? Or their partner? Or their child?

A person’s honesty is what we all admire, not their snake-in-the-grass deceits.

 

 

7: The truth will set you free

Being honest with others encourages honesty in return. It encourages an environment of clear-sightedness in which we can exercise our powers of thought and decision-making to the full.

 

Honesty is something to which we should all aspire.

Honesty fuels integrity.

Honesty sets us free.

 

 

 

See also the previous article in this series: A short conversation about lying.

For a detailed discussion of the parallel topics of propaganda and lies, see Ethical Intelligence by Luke Andreski:

www.amazon.co.uk/Ethical-Intelligence-Luke-Andreski/dp/179580579X

 

Twitter & Facebook: @EthicalRenewal

 

 

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The Practice of Ethics – A Leadership Guide

Morality – A critical success factor for business and society?

Luke Andreski – Graham Williams

 

There can be little doubt that we have reached a point in our history which is marked by profound ethical issues.

We face the acceleration of AI, an environmental crisis, the potential for future conflict over resource, probable large-scale migrations and an ascendancy of populist authoritarianism in politics across the world.

In parallel with this, another disturbing change has occurred. Morality has become unfashionable. It is no longer cool – and now carries with it connotations of ‘moralising’, of self-satisfaction or superiority, of being ‘moralistic’ or ‘preachy’. It’s as if, in the world of realpolitik and commerce, ethics no longer matter. Effectiveness and profit have taken morality’s place. ‘What’s in it for me?’ has become our guiding principle.

Yet this is a guiding principle which places our world in jeopardy. ‘What’s in it for me?’ cannot provide a solution to the major challenges which our businesses, our economies and even our species now face.

In addition to compassion, truth is at the heart of any moral code. If we cannot see our world clearly, if we are unable to separate reality from fake news or ideology, then how can we navigate our way towards personal, business or wider societal success? The reverse is also true. As our society drifts away from honesty, so it increasingly attacks it: a vicious circle we see all around us. It is now common to say, particularly of our politicians, that ‘everybody lies’. This then becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. Lying is normalised. We see this amongst some of the most prominent politicians of today’s world. A willingness to lie is no longer considered a quality which debars them from office. And the more they lie, the more they hate the truth. To quote George Orwell, “The further society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those who speak it.” A wonderful example of this is seen in this interview with Michael Gove, the British politician campaigning for Brexit and the re-election of the Boris Johnson government:

https://www.channel4.com/news/michael-gove-interview-on-truth-lies-and-brexit.

It is also replicated in the many attacks we see from populist politicians on journalism and the press. Populism disdains experts and facts.

 

“To assert that everybody lies becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. Lying is normalised.”

 

In collaboration with Graham Williams, a writer and consultant based in Cape Town, South Africa, I’ve been looking at how we can reassert the value of morality, honesty and compassion in a business context, and also for society as a whole. In a series of articles for Phase3 Consulting and HRZone I’ve argued for the value of ethics specifically within business. In my book Intelligent Ethics I expand this argument to society as a whole; and in his powerful work, The Virtuosa Organisation, Graham takes a similar approach.

 

There are so often situations in the marketplace where “business considerations” take precedence over ethical considerations – an either/or solution. Our contention is that this is a mistaken dichotomy. Business considerations (efficiency and profit) are in fact enhanced by adopting an ethical approach. Unethical practices exist in many toxic workplaces, including all forms of discrimination and exclusion, harassment, overt or unconscious prejudice and bullying – and tackling these can only benefit the performance, reputation and, ultimately, the profit of the business.

Leadership, training and coaching responses all too often fall into the ‘compliance’ and ‘rules’ category, when what is needed is:

  • Development of an intrinsic ethical maturity and value base
  • Encouragement of a learning, growth and mastery journey
  • Nurturing of appropriate application in the context of the situations faced and their community impacts

To assist with this, we have drawn together a map of ethical best practice, outlining a set of cultural, process and human capital considerations for business leaders, a framework for:

  • Providing a quick overview of the ethics landscape
  • Moving from a rules-based to a values-based mind-set
  • Guiding people how to behave positively and effectively, overcoming a bystander mentality
  • Entrenching an understanding that ethics is an important bridge in aligning behaviours with core values

 

“Business considerations (efficiency and profit) are in fact enhanced by adopting an ethical approach.”

 

We hope you find this guide useful.

 

The Practice of Ethics - A Leadership Guide - Luke Anddreski - Graham Williams Vs 1.1

 

Luke Andreski

Graham Williams

November 2019

 

 

 

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